Last week, I was part of a very interesting discussion about how data sharing in ecology has, so far, failed. Up to 64% of archived datasets are made public in a way that prevents re-use, but this is not even the biggest problem. We are currently sharing ecological data in a way that is mostly useless.

What is computational ecology? I am working on a manuscript to discuss this topic in the context of ecological synthesis. Since it is almost ready, I would love to get some feedback. And so I have pasted below a part of the introduction. If this little experiment goes well, I will add another section next week, before making it public as a preprint. Think of this as a trailer. To an academic article. Because these, I guess, are the times we live in.

In a few weeks, I will be giving a talk at the Association Francophone pour le Savoir annual meeting in McGill University, about how advanced research computing (aka high performance computing) can accelerate discoveries in biodiversity sciences and ecology. Collecting data on any ecosystem, no matter how small, is painstaking. It is long. It is expensive. And as a result, we have a relatively small amount of data. So what could advanced research computing possibly deliver?